A Case for Reverting the US to a Hemp-based Economy

Dear Americans, statespersons, and citizens of the world,

Hemp (Cannabis sativa) can be used for nearly everything currently utilized in our society: from food, to clothing, to paper, to textiles and housing materials, to plastics, to graphene and hence nanotechnology, as well as providing fuel for automobiles and power centers. It is without doubt the most versatile natural resource available on the planet and bears negligible, nearly untraceable amounts of THC (>.3%) and is purposefully bred industrially to keep that psychotropic chemical low.

This proposal calls for a complete legal reform pertaining to industrial hemp; (optimally) to include governmental subsidy to industrialists for the building of processing centers in agricultural areas (this would help to keep energy of production low); and to farmers (regulated by a governing body), growing purposefully diversified strains of hemp (as some strains of hemp are good for fuel, others are good for food, and still others for fiber – farmers would then be partially constrained based on what processing center or centers opened near them [It is preferential, of course, to have every sort of processing plant within a near proximity of the fields, as this would allow each region to become more self-sufficient]) to provide the individual communities that comprise the United States the security they so greatly need and deserve; and to help facilitate a cultural shift in consciousness about hemp and its consumer consumption.

Whatever Made Humanity also gave us a plant that will do everything that we need, but we have villainized it, for greed and Industry and misunderstanding. But we cannot bow any longer to the corruption of capitalism and corporate self-interest, or to ignorance. The status quo can no longer stand – there has been too much damage to the environment for the sake of fiscal gluttony and it will kill us all, fat cats and paupers alike, unless we act radically as immediately as possible.

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Nerd Blurbs: The Future of Space Edition

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That’s…not how you use a plastic bag….

Greetings future spaceman,

On this episode of Nerd Blurbs we look at the US Commercial Space Launch Competiveness Act, unanimously approved last week, explore space drone technology, and take a look at a new development in environment suits.

Senate Unanimously Passes Space Bill
On Tuesday, the 4th of August 2015, the US Senate unanimously approved the US Commercial Space Launch Competiveness Act, spearheaded by two Republican presidential candidates, Ted Cruz of Texas and Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, extending the operations of the International Space Station to 2024 and the regulatory moratorium on commercial space industry to 2020. What that means is that NASA will be funded for nearly another decade with the purpose of keeping the International Space Station operational, and that industry seeking to put people into space will not be regulated by the government after they “prioritize safety, utilize existing authorities, minimize burdens, promote the US commercial space sector, and meet the United States obligations under international treaties.” This is huge news for the private and public sectors of space travel, as it guarantees that humans will still be striving for the stars and that they have the unanimous backing of both Democrats and Republicans, as this Act is in fact bipartisan.

With the US government getting out of the way of the people who will probably get our asses off this planet, our expectations for space travel grows somewhat. We are still a long way from being in a place where we would survive another extinction event, like the seven or so that happened before we ever got here. Colonization of neighboring planets and moons is necessary within the next 60 years if we are expected to survive the conditions that we have created on this planet. Thankfully other people are thinking about colonization, specifically:

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Though Terminator Elon Musk is not impressed.

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Top 5 Reasons Not To See Fantastic Four

Fantastic Four opened this weekend with lackluster reception, both critically and commercially. In this article we will explore why it didn’t do so well, from the rehashing of the origin story all the way to the studio problem. Strap in and read on as we list the top 5 reasons not to see the Fantastic Four movie directed by Josh Trank.

The Story

In this iteration of the Fantastic Four story, the cast of characters gets transported to another dimension. The world that they go to is fractured and cracked and a tragedy befalls them, similar to the original origin story, where the Fantastic Four are shot into space and are exposed to cosmic rays, per the Stan Lee creation. They return to our dimension to find that their bodies are altered, all of them exhibiting strange new powers.

The problems with the script and the story are the same that befell Sony Pictures last attempt at rebooting Spider Man, where they are, firstly, rehashing the origin story of characters already in the public consciousness, both through comic books and via the films that preceded this one. It would be much more interesting, I think, to start at the sequel (with a big fight, where they are victorious despite Ben’s increasing agitation, Susan’s inability to control her powers, and Johnny’s daredevil-may-care recklessness) and use flashbacks to demonstrate Reed’s guilt and responsibility for his friends and love interests’ problems, and his ceaseless attempts to cure them while also using their powers for good.

A message to Hollywood, if you’re reading this, please listen to us when we say we already know these characters. They are part of our collective consciousness: this is why you’re making this movie in the first place – it’s already a thing, why make a movie explaining it’s a thing? Just be the thing. Speaking of the Thing…

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Missing Links: Visuals Edition

The human eye has developed over hundreds of thousands of years and allows us to see a wide range of colors and hues (though not as wide as some creatures). This week on Missing Links, we’ll give your eyes a treat, as well as your eyes, showing you everything from representations of time, science experiments you shouldn’t do at home, and even holo technology. Strap yourself in, we’ve got all your tasty links after the jump.
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Nerd Blurbs: Pretty Colors Edition

Greetings Internets!

Today in Nerd Blurbs we discuss some small things with big color: scientists discover new spiders, artists visualize light as both a wave and a particle, and a comet acts like a drunken fratboy. All this after the jump.
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Nerd Blurbs: Life Edition

The news-sphere was alive today, September 21st, 2013, with many reports pertaining to things living (and fairly finally dead). We’ve got sequences and atrocities and discoveries, oh my! Just goes to show that reality has way more going on than fiction and you can’t make this stuff up. We start with tiger sequencing after the break.

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Nerd Blurbs: Black Internet Wednesday Edition

Sorry for the late posting: my fiancee’s father passed away on Friday and we’ve been away helping the family. Funeral is tomorrow, so posting should continue again as per usual after that. But enough of my personal life: let’s get to the news.

You leave the Internet alone for TWO DAYS and this happens?! Sheesh.

Better get your Internetting done right now because Wednesday, 8AM Washington DC time through 8PM the same, your favorite websites will be blotted out. Internet staples Google, Wikipedia, MoveOn.org, The I Can Haz Cheezburger Network, Mozilla, Reddit, Minecraft, Twitpic, WordPress, and hundreds of others (full list here: scroll down) will either be turning off their servers or blacking out their content in opposition to the House of Representatives passing the Stop Online Piracy Act and the fast-tracked Protect Intellectual Property Act currently moving up the circuit. You can click the picture above to lend support as an individual.

The L.A. Times blurbed when it was just 24 hours looming before the blackout, that Jimmy Wales, co-founder of Wikipedia, had spoken with the BBC about Wikipedia’s contribution to the event tomorrow and that a protest would be placed instead of its English language site come 8AM EST. This is very similar to when high school professors find their students siting Wikipedia for their term papers: blanket protest.

The LA Times expanded their coverage here, because apparently they’re really concerned about not being able to access Wikipedia half-a-day. Actually, they go into greater depth about the ins and outs of the debate. It turns out the MPAA is directly behind the push of SOPA, so you automatically know the bill is inherently evil. Said MPAA executive Michael O’Leary, about how people are distorting the issues: “It’s part and parcel of a campaign to distract from the real issue here and to draw people away from trying to resolve what is a real problem, which is that foreigners continue to steal the hard work of Americans.”

I see – so it’s only foreign people that buy bootlegs. Nice try, O’Leary, but you’re clearly blanketing the real concern: you’re trying to pass off Americans as completely innocent in this when most of the downloads are coming from inside our own house. I suppose it’s good politicking, but like most of that sort of stuff, it reeks of bullshit.

Google and Ebay make more valid points, as that second LA Times link mentions, in that the wording of the bill offers operators of websites no real due process: if you get accused of showing someone else’s intellectual property you will get shut down. Firstly, that’s not the way the judicial process is supposed to work. Secondly, as the Internet companies so eloquently stated: “the result would be censorship and a strangling of the free flow of information that represents the soul of Web freedom.” Of course now we’re getting into A.I. metaphysics, but let’s not get side-tracked.

All this Internet hulla-baloo is coming on the heels of an announcement from The White House last week, as the Huffington Post reports, via three of the President’s secretaries, stating that the White House would not endorse SOPA/PIPA, because it would infringe on legal online usage and the way large and small businesses operate. The White House, continuing in the message, essential said, “We can’t get all 1984 up in this hizzy because we’re trying to send the smackdown on some guys acting all illegally.” Or something to that effect. I dunno for certain, this article has taken too long and I need to batten-down the hatches before the lock-down.

Hope you all have a amicable Wednesday with a great big piss-off to the MPAA (contradictory sentiments?). Hopefully we’ll come back to a better, brighter Internet than the one under attack.

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